Turizam

Tunnel

The underground tunnel dates back to World War II and is open to visitors after almost 80 years. It is a tunnel located under the famous summer stage.

The new tourist attraction, 130 meters long, is enriched with contents from the history of this place. After the reconstruction, visitors will have the opportunity to get a picture of the spa’s development from the Roman period, through the Turkish and German occupations, to the present day, thanks to the exhibited models and objects. Furthermore, these exhibition spaces will present numerous weapons, cannons, rifles, crossbows, tools, armors, German and partisan uniforms, and various objects found during archeological excavations.

The underground tunnel dates back to World War II and is open to visitors after almost 80 years. It is a tunnel located under the famous summer stage.

The new tourist attraction, 130 meters long, is enriched with contents from the history of this place. After the reconstruction, visitors will have the opportunity to get a picture of the spa’s development from the Roman period, through the Turkish and German occupations, to the present day, thanks to the exhibited models and objects. Furthermore, these exhibition spaces will present numerous weapons, cannons, rifles, crossbows, tools, armors, German and partisan uniforms, and various objects found during archeological excavations.

The tunnel will retain its authenticity following the Institute for the Protection of Monuments provisions. Certain parts will be repaired primarily to ensure the safety of visitors.

The tunnel was planned to be a shelter for the German General Staff for Southeast Europe. The excavation began in 1942 and was led by General Alexander Löhr, commander of German troops in the Balkans and Southeast Europe, leader of the Operation Rösselsprung, and commander of the April 6 Belgrade bombing. Interestingly, the tunnel was broken through only in 1944, after a year and a half, when the two teams met in the middle of Crkveno brdo, digging each on its side at the same time. There are seven rooms in the tunnel. The second started tunnel arm in the direction of the market on one side, and villa “Peć” on the other, was not completed.

Villa “Turkulović,” which changed its name after World War II and is today called Villa “Partizanka,” is connected by the tunnel with Crkveno brdo and the former German headquarters. Villa Turkulović is known as the place where Operation Rösselsprung was planned. It was led from this villa by famous Otto Skorzeny.